The Meaning of the Immaculate Conception

The Meaning of the Immaculate Conception

Dear Blog Guests, Fr. Thomas comments for us on the meaning of the Immaculate Conception (which we will celebrate at the monastery on December 9 this year, since the traditional date of Dec. 8 falls on the 2nd Sunday of Advent):

"In 1854, Pope Pius IX proclaimed the Church’s teaching of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Ever-Virgin Mary. By a singular grace and very exceptional privilege of God, Mary was preserved immune from the stain of original sin at the very first moment of her conception. Why? The consequence of this exceptional grace is that Mary is All-Holy. Her soul, that is, her life, was free from any sin either original or personal and totally open to being the Mother of Jesus Christ, our God Incarnate.

Any sin whatever is a barrier between a person and God. This means that there was no barrier between Mary and Almighty God. As she grew from a newborn infant into a mature woman, her will was always totally open to the will of God. She always and freely gave a total and comprehensive ‘yes’ to the Will of God. This made her exceptionally capable in grasping the mystery of God’s goodness and selfless love as manifested in the Incarnation of her Son.

Accordingly, the Immaculate Conception is an encouragement for us to become one with God’s will so as to transformed into the goodness that is the heart of charity, or the divine selfless love, the grace offered us in Christ Jesus."

God bless you under the patronage of Our Holy Mother; may she lead us all closer to Her Divine Son, Jesus!

--Your brothers of New Clairvaux

 

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Prayer

Cistercian monastic life gives primary place of chanting the Opus Dei or Divine Office in community as well as personal time spent in sacred reading which fulfill the monk's sacred duty of seeking God.

Hospitality

Cistercian monastic life allows rooms for guests because all guests are to be received as Christ.  We never know if we have entertained angels.

Life in Common

Cistercian monastic life is communal:  We share all things in common as did the early Christian community so as to live in greater charity and union with Christ.