The Hidden Life of Jesus

The Hidden Life of Jesus

Brother Christopher comments on the Hidden Life of Jesus: “According the chronology of the Gospel of Saint John, the public ministry of Jesus took up only 3 of His 33 years on earth, thus 90% of His time in the flesh was taken up by His hidden life.  For many years I thought, how much patience it must have taken for Jesus to wait for the call of the Father to begin His public ministry, how eager He must have been to get things started! Then on further reflection, I thought, No.  Jesus had already begun His saving ministry.  His mission from the Father was to undo the DISOBEDIENCE of Adam by His own COMPLETE OBEDIENCE to God. Jesus did whatever the Father wanted Him to do completely, whether that was ordinary or extraordinary.    His obedience to the ordinary life of a man in an ordinary village plying the trade of carpentry, because that was what the Father was asking of Him, was ALREADY the complete obedience that was redeeming the world.  One could even speculate that if Jesus lived His WHOLE earthly life obscure and unknown, but completely faithful and obedient to the Will of God, He would still have saved the world by His obedience. 

The thing is, we have the same opportunity everyday: to cooperate with Jesus in the redemption of the world by being faithful and obedient to God in our ordinary lives and in the performance of the daily duties that God asks of us.  At every moment, we can follow Jesus in His saving obedience.”

Prayers and Blessings,

Your brothers of New Clairvaux 

#Jesus #obedience #redemption #Adam #disobedience #HiddenLife #trappists #monks #publicministry

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Prayer

Cistercian monastic life gives primary place of chanting the Opus Dei or Divine Office in community as well as personal time spent in sacred reading which fulfill the monk's sacred duty of seeking God.

Hospitality

Cistercian monastic life allows rooms for guests because all guests are to be received as Christ.  We never know if we have entertained angels.

Life in Common

Cistercian monastic life is communal:  We share all things in common as did the early Christian community so as to live in greater charity and union with Christ.